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would like to present two certificates to you. on behalf of the board of education and the san francisco unified school district. [applause] >> i talked to ester this morning, and i promise i will not take too long. but i will first share my time with two of my outstanding staff members. mrs. jeanna chow and mr. taylor. >> hi, i am jena chou, and i am a kindergarten teacher. i would like to share a few quick reflections. i remember when alice fong yu didn't have enough student and we had to sell the program. and now we don't have to sell the program, in fact we are all sold out. i remember when students went to chinatown to practice the skills and the culture. and now students travel to china to speak the language and live the culture. and none of this it would be without liana szeto. i remember her tireless way to be sure of this success. and determined and still has tireless energy and still have the vision. only now she needs to see it in a slightly larger font. i am -- [laughter] i was going to take that out, but my staff said to keep it in. i am so honored to be a part of alice fong
professional educator defined my professional path. when i recalled this dismissal in those two sentences, i am reminded of the thing that (inaudible) in the intervening years. however these 12 words are not only enough to express the challenges that my team and i have faced, but they stand for our triumphs as well. despite a skeptical and hostile environment, we survived. starting in the 80s with just 25 students started as the first chinese public school opened in san francisco in 1985. as i remember, i remember the quote, which would you teach chinese to them? i try to recall that and to what my colleague said has grown from a small pocket of multi-ethnic students to a student body comprised of many diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. i try to recall how hard we fought, administrator and parents and students and teachers alike. and what we each sacrificed to be be where -- to be where we are today. today i am humbled by my students who excel in two languages and our students are asked to demonstrate their chinese skills. today our graduates go to beijing, china to build bridges using their s
always do, especially after being solely instructed by hydra as our education advisor to present the proclamation declaring the month of oct filipino-american month in san francisco. come on up here. get up here, so everybody can take a picture here. if i may, i just wanted to say something as well. you know, there are many streets of our great, great city and everybody i think is now enjoying so many of the neighborhoods that are rising up. but there have been neighborhoods like desoma and the excelsior, critical names of streets that we named after filipinos who really served our city and country in a fabulous way. i want to make sure that people remember that. because it's part of our history. so let me say some of them that many of you in the room know, but a lot of our people don't know that. you ever see the names? (listing names ) if you were really smart and if you are as smart as hydra wants everybody to be in san francisco, because of her board of education work, you should know victoria manalo dreys park. that was named after vicky dreyes, a filipino olympian from san
, on this board, all educators, parents, security, secretaries, whoever they may be, who are in charge of our children when they are not in our care, and they are at the school site that we have the utmost compassion and respect for our children. so i just wanted to say thank you because all of you know on this board know how many times that have i come forward and asked for help, but what i have gotten in return is removal. i would like for you to reach out to me, because i know what works in the bayview and in the southeast. i know the families and the communities in the bayview. i know the church leaders in the bayview and in the southeast sector of the city. i know that we need to close the achievement gap of the targeted population, which is the african-american, the latinos, the polynesians, and our chinese-american children, because we are having all of these problems at our school sites our chinese-american children have come to me and told me that they will not do well in the c s.a.t. and they are struggling and that should not be. thank you for allowing me this time president yee,
shows huge role in education, and i look for someone to have impact on me. she educates with fun, she deserving this award because of her passionate input and i would like mr. tim allen to share this award. >> thank you, and good evening board of education and ladies and gentlemen. it is my honor to be here tonight. i get the opportunity to travel throughout california and make presentations at board meetings. and as you can imagine, some of them are quite interesting. but tonight i have a very good feeling about what is going on in this district. and congratulations to you, and what you have done. just seeing these students and the quality of the work they have learned is a testament to what you are doing in this district. i would like to share with you briefly the history of this award. i think it brings more meaning to what we are doing for teac r teache teachers. the carlson family began a company in the late 70s. and they took 5% of their profits and encouraged their employees to go out and work for not-for-profit in the bay area. and they could come back and ask for grants in s
board does, sharing high quality courses that are designed and built upon and refined through educators working together. >> i want to separate these four second. i could not agree with you more that brilliant minds helped shape a common core. as opposed to the construction -- >> it was a combination of mathematicians and educators. if you're making turf courses -- >> we have teacher preparation programs across the country. many of them not the kinds of institutions for which people are recruited. we're trying to get these programs to overhaul what they do. i understand the value of trying to share practices. i am curious. are there other ways to help change what is going on? >> let me pause and celebrate your candor in the following sense. this is the time in a time of limited resources to step out. when people ask what more resources to need to implement it worries me as a question in the sense that we have to learn how to redirect and be more efficient and to get an edge of the few things these standards are asking us to do. i am saying you're right. as a system, producing productive
to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introduction -- no, i get to say someth
the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader of the known world in a few hundred years? it expanded its territory by plunder, by what ever. details. it was not pretty. [laughter] it added people, it kept getting bigger and incorporated the people and to roman citizenship. it became very consolidated, expanding group of energetic people. and they'll work. they were not just a bunch of talkers, they were doing. -- there were doers. -- they were doers. we have to consolidate on this. we have to find the common path that will enable us to make the investments and undergo the sacrifice that is required because it is not all ice cream and cake here. you have to curtail consumption. whether it is a business or household. in terms of -- the free sector. it is still the same game. looking out for the future, saving for tomorr
sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young pe
on the san francisco public utilities commission and for the education plans for the choice aggregation and cleanpower sf program. >> okay. very good. colleagues it's a really as president torres as said it's a momentous occasion, historic occasion we had. we improved our relationship with shell and the allocation for the cleanpower sf and we're looking how the power can be maximized in the next year as we in fact the process of enrollment. i've actually believe that the timing of this could not be anymore -- anymore important to do today because of our global climate change that is happening, and i believe that we're seeing -- actually on the way here today i was listening to the radio. there was a report on democracy now that a portion of our artic ice about the size of the united states of america had melted this year which is significant to really alter what the temperature of the ocean is and we're seeing what really the impact of -- every year we're seeing dramatic examples of climate change and hurricane sandy being one of them. we're also seeing around the world real demogr
of education. congratulations new vice president fewer. don't mean to interrupt you while you are eating. and of course president norton, i believe president of the school board is the highest that anyone norton has risen since joshua crowned himself emperor. >> there is hope for me yet. >> we are talking about substitutes and like san francisco the sub -- substitutes are part of the union. they keep the classes going when teachers cannot be present. substitutes are the vice presidents for every teacher ready to step in and carry on if an emergency occurs. substitutes are the relief pitcher in the baseball of education. substitutes are the understudies to the teachers that star on stage. in california there are several categories of substitutes. we will talk about core substitutes and return to other substitute issues at future meetings. thank you very much. [applause] >> good evening, i am irvin. i am one of 15 core substitute teachers. we work at schools often covering the most difficult classrooms in the district. core substitutes are credentialed and certified. or average time in the
of a strong-handed role in sort of picking winners and losers in determining who gets educated and how they get educated -- those forms of capitalism seem to be gaining the upper hand in the global debate. and i think we have to recognize that if we don't address the flaws in our own system like the flaws associated with inequality or the inability to create jobs or the free rein given to big investors at the expense of everybody else, we're going to lose our influence, the model's going to change, and we're going to be at a disadvantage. >> host: what's china doing right? >> guest: well, they're growing fast. that helps. by 2030, you know, china's second biggest economy in the world right now. we think of it as an exporting economy, but really their growth has been internal. by 2030, which is not that long away although it sounds far away, they'll be the world's largest consumer economy. they'll be the ones setting the trend in terms of what a car is like and what a washing machine is like can and what an ipad is like. but they're also building more cities than anybody else. they're g
to -- safety and more pro-business and less red tape and access to capital. it wanted a good education system. it is training so businesses can get the right workers. it is best known for its ski resorts and quality of life. the real challenge we have been working on in turning this thing around is to say, how do we become the most pro-business state? california will be more pro- business. oregon will be more pro- business. how to create that competition to be the most pro-business state but to hold ourselves to higher standards. we want to be the best of being pro-business. that focus, trying to get the partisanship to -- our legislators and state voters are one-third independent, republican and democrat and our legislature is almost evenly divided. if we pass our budget last week with 94 of 100 boats. i think we have been successful and beginning to get past the partisanship. this time to quit playing games and finding compromises. >> other specific things you were trying to do to make colorado more business friendly? >> we have efforts in every single agency of state government to cut spec
of the indian education act. she has moved beyond the limits of her duties for the families in her district. she spends time volunteers for all community functions that the alliance puts on. the families that she serves remember her fondly and all that she did for them. she offered her talents to powwows, food booths, graduations and dinners and let's watch a video on gwen stirrer. >> i am [inaudible] known as the keepers of the western door. they're on the western side of new york and they're the biggest of the tribes. i'm the one -- i'm the one that creeks that runs through our reservation now. indian community -- there was nothing in the beginning. for 20 years that i work in the school district helping the children understand that their heritage was important, and important to be proud of being indian, and so that gave them reasons to study harder and to be a better student and stay in school. where you come from is important and what your background is and your family, so we have to have indian education. i don't think i'm a hero. i just had a job to do, and did it with the chi
, the bully project, and we have been bringing the film and educating, training professional development largely thriewr our partnership with them and provides that to school districts and classrooms across the country for free, so educators can sign up, and if they agree to do the training and to take it seriously and embed it with the kids and the adults in the community we provide them with oftentimes busing, but often free tickets so they can see the film outside of school and make it an event and that is our project "1 million kids". we're doing it in a big way here in the bay area thanks to the leadership in this community. yep and oakland and all over. it's just awesome and in cleveland and right now we have 13,000 students across the basin in salt lake city are seeing it, and does have impact and the impact is largely i would say it creates a sense of agreement. the biggest thing that bully does or the big service the film has is gives everyone a unified collective science of agreement to which they roll up the sleeves and get busy creating change and has been really exciting
-ups, we are taking steps to make sure conn leads again. when it came to education, the stakes were clear. take action together or risk losing an entire generation of young people to failing schools and a widening achievement gap. i am proud that after a long and hard debate, we were able to say with one voice, that the status quo was no locker acceptable. that when it comes to public education, we cannot keep doing what we have always done and simply hope for better results. that our kids cannot afford it and our state cannot afford it as well. we work with an eye towards a future and have made an historic investment of nearly $100 million from three k to high- school, focusing on those districts that are most in need. reaching kids early is critical to the success and early childhood education had to be a central portion of our education reform. so we created 1000 new school readiness opens statewide for youngsters at a time when no one thought that it was possible. that is 1000 more children that will show up to kindergarten this fall ready to learn. we did that together, and we will d
not addressing the costs of education at all. it is about increasing government funding to help students go to school. we need to be focusing on and we need to be focusing on what are the costs that can be reduced to bring these costs down, make schools more competitive, so students have a competitive choice of which university to go to. >> we will let you go, as we hear from traunch mitchell. -- josh mitchell. >> a lot of schools are starting to increase things at a faster pace. i think there is so much scrutiny these days. it is kind of like health care. why are costs rising? i think they're going to start to see a lot of pressure from congress to rein in their costs. >> josh mitchell writes for "the wall street journal," and thanks for spending the last half hour with us. >> yes. >> and we appreciate all of your phone calls, comments on twitter, and the conversation continues online, and the question we have been asking is, how much debt is worth going into college? [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013
is a massive public education campaign for parents and educators. for people about how to use these tools responsibly. >> we are still adapting as a society and learning what it means to be exposed due to the way we track our lives and share information online. and i do agree with that. that's part of the problem here, getting everyone educated. >> right now employers are saying, all right, if you want a job come you have to tell us your password so we can go on your private website. >> the bottom line is there are laws governing employment in the united states. there are certain things an employer can ask and certain things they cannot pass. an employer cannot ask marital status. an employer cannot use that information against you in a hiring decision. >> but how do you prove that? >> we need additional loss? i don't know. there are laws on the books right now. once we had it last summer opened my eyes to a lot of information that employers can gather on people. there is a startup company who is running their business like the way a credit reporting agency runs their business. so what th
and features an increase in spending for education, transportation, and even a rainy day fund. cbs 5 reporter grace lee joins us with how this is beginning of a new era. >> reporter: budget chair senator mark leno called this budget a breath of fresh air after so many tough years of cutting back it's a different proposal that we're hearing. but the governor says this is knots the time to start spending wildly and is giving more money to schools but the way he wants to do it is already causing waves. >> drizzle... >> reporter: in the city of richmond, perry's elementary school has 600 students. every, single one on reduced or free lunch. and after years of cutting back, they have learned they will get more money under the new budget. >> we are thrilled with lower class sizes enhance the educational experience by actually having an extra period. so maybe they can have a music program play an instrument. they can actually do art, drama, more lits racy. >> reporter: the plan proposes to spend $56 billion on k-12 schools adding an additional $2 billion
a little more sleep can improve student health and education. the school board wonders if this idea will and to be expensive. >> seven 17 a.m. that is when school begins and anne arundel county. according to research, it is the early as wake up all in the state. heather leads the group start school later, which now has chapters in many states. she is petitioning to the school board with signatures to let students sleep in a bit longer. >> we know the health impacts of sleep approbation that the kids are experiencing. it is quite experience. some of the long-term impacts are not know. >> bus pickup times can be as early as i 50 a.m. that is dark in the winter. that is a safety issue. >> no student should be on a bus earlier than 7 a.m. and not earlier than 8 a.m. in a classroom. dr. owen says it is well- documented that in adolescents body chemistry affects their sleep. >> there is a natural shift in wake and sleep time that is associated with problems of teenagers getting to sleep much before 11 p.m. they simply cannot small -- they cannot fall asleep. >> high school as an middle sc
killed by the taliban for promoting girls' education was released from the hospital today. the attack in october led to worldwide condemnation, and an outpouring of sympathy for her cause. nbc's keir simmons has more tonight. >> reporter: malala walking from the hospital today. a strong woman, her doctors say, making excellent progress. in pictures released by the hospital, the affection of her nurses is evident. >> i think it's fantastic news she has come out of the hospital. and it's actually particularly a relief to her family. >> reporter: family members in the uk have visited regularly but doctors decided living with them would help her recovery. >> they were finding it difficult to properly educate her in the hospital. so they wanted her to be even more with the family, because only father and mother were allowed every day. >> reporter: just three months ago in pakistan, malala was near death, shot in the head by the taliban. they were angered by her campaign for women's education. >> if you can help us, please help. >> reporter: instead of killing her, they made this teenage gi
perspectives on all sorts of issues including economics, education, the environment. i think you'll see a lot of different thoughts and ideas on how to get things done and how to find compromise. host: how does a play out with women in leadership roles? guest: we have a new number of women serving on committees and shares. barbara mikulski is the first women's chair of the appropriations committee. how that will change, we will see. we have more and more -- patty murray, dianne feinstein. these are significant changes. very interesting on the house side. we have seven women ranking on major committees and the house. the house republicans have zero women cheering any major committees. they are all white men and have one woman chairing a minor committee and that is the administration committee. we feel we are in a great place. froml see a lot of work emily's list to get the majority of back in the house. host: what role did your organization plate in the election of these women? guest: we are in it for the long haul. emily's list has been working with some women since they were in the state leg
francisco are carrying messages of jihad but not what you mate think. campaign to educate residents about the real meaning of the word campaign that began in chicago and now reached the bay area. amma explains. >> what is yours is the statement on the side of the muni bus. part of educational campaign created by care the council on american islamic relation. group put 35 ads open buses rolling through the streets of san francisco. >> intention of the campaign is to educate fellow americans about what the word jihad mean means. >>reporter: she is the executive director of care bay area office. >> common misconception of the word is that it means armed struggle or holy war. and that is something that is perpetrated by many who have made careers out of pushing this anti-muslim sentiment. >>reporter: i asked if they gnaw the definite figures of jihad. >> holy war. >>reporter: miriam did he fains it as holy war and another definition. >> proper meaning as we describe it is to struggle. to me that is building relationships with the neighbors to make to work on time or better on the diet
notification and education plan there, the framework is clear and i think it's a good starting point to move forward for the city and i believe that while we have had comments about talking about caution i think they're well meaning how to have a successful program but i think the success of the program is that we roll out quickly with the notification and the education plan. that's going to be most meaningful. i also want to make sure that we're really clear that the effort is really working in the deep green areas first and foremost where we know a particular target audience is for the message and we know how to craft that message for them as well. i think that is going to be significant. we're not reaching out to every population in san francisco from the get go but the deep green area is where we need to focus the efforts on. this plan incorporates that and i believe it's the right way to go. i would like to move forward approving something today that can later be implemented early next year and hopefully we can move that in that direction. commissioner olague. >> yeah. i just wan
in that process. >> 18 reasons was started almost four years ago as an educational arm of their work. and we would have dinners and a few classes and we understood there what momentum that people wanted this type of engagement and education in a way that allowed for a more in-depth conversation. we grew and now we offer -- i think we had nine, we have a series where adults learned home cooking and we did a teacher training workshop where san francisco unified public school teachers came and learned to use cooking for the core standards. we range all over the place. we really want everyone to feel like they can be included in the conversation. a lot of organizations i think which say we're going to teach cooking or we're going to teach gardening, or we're going to get in the policy side of the food from conversation. we say all of that is connected and we want to provide a place that feels really community oriented where you can be interested in multiple of those things or one of those things and have an entree point to meet people. we want to build community and we're using food as a means to that
making the city work for everyone to make sure that we have the best public education system in the world. we have to make sure that we do that. we talked about diversity earlier. we talked about ethnic and racial diversity. but sexual orientation and gender identity also matter. we have a long history and tradition in san francisco of welcoming diversity when it comes to sexual orientation and gender identity. we have not gotten to the point where we can be completely satisfied that we are what we need to be. more than half -- almost half of all of the homeless youth in the city are lgbt youth; many are struggling for basic housing. we have many challenges but i am confident that we as a board, we as a city, can come together. i'm confident that we will really make sure that this is a city that works for everyone. and i want you to know - my colleagues and i remember the public not only those who are here those who are watching % that the supervisor is committed to doing everything i can so that san francisco lives up to the promise that i think is the promise
thought i'd mention that. the other thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the attitudes don'
and killed. >> in tonight's education alert, for the fifth consecutive year, maryland ranked the no. 1 school system in the nation according to "education week" magazine. tim tooten has the story we first brought you today. this is getting to be old hat, isn't it? >> martineau mallee -- martin o'malley taking on critics of the school's success. >> we students show our appreciation by working hard. >> it was a celebration of the state's new ranking at the jones elementary school. that is when governor martin o'malley showed up to celebrate. >> as a result of our top choices, maryland public schools have been named for the fifth year in a row the number one public schools in america. maryland received an overall grade of b-plus. an a for transition and alignment, which tests college readiness and childhood education. a b for maths. among other grades, a b for k-12 achievement, which tracks all students perform on national tests. a b for standards, assessments, and accountability programs. >> it is just wonderful. is -- it is historic for our educators. >> maryland is among those celebrating the
advisory commission, comprised of experts in mental health, education, law enforcement, and first response. we may never know what motivated the events at sandy hook elementary, but that won't stop us from working to prevent future tragedy. over the coming months, the commission will come together to make specific, actionable recommendations in the areas of school safety, mental health services, and gun violence prevention. this session, i know there will be others that take action on these issues, and i applaud those efforts. the more resources we can bring to bear on this issue, the better. working together we can and will affect real change. there are some things we know already. we know that we must find ways to better respond to those with mental health needs. as a society, we have an obligation to take action in a meaningful way when a person seeks our help or demonstrates a need for it. we must balance our respect for individual rights with our obligation to provide for the greater public safety. and when it comes to preventing future acts of violence in our schools, let me say this
for those of innovation that can help shift the task to work being done by educated eco-and the interface between service provider and community and increase the demand. but if we don't ship to innovation, way. >> i should clarify for audience that the human immune system i very specifically targeted by the hiv virus. so as your cd-4 count goes down, you're headed for his part said the case of the disease. we have time for one more question. i think i sought and stars of family care international but air. >> thanks, laurie. i wanted to ask if you could, specifically in what you see as priorities and transcendent possibilities in sub-saharan africa, the region where the problem of hiv/aids is most severe in terms of population and in particular from the perspective of the long-term potential and the question of the most strategic approach in terms of dealing with hava is more or less of it or to publish your integrate cnet with the provision of basic health services, reproductive, newborn and maternal services, what you see is the most appropriate strategy for dealing with this in africa.
a national communications network, in gauging the on issues ranging from transportation to education, to preserving the capabilities of our national guard. while each governor has his or her own unique circumstances, we all have to facilitate job growth, improve schools, and be financially responsible. as much as we do in our states, our economies are tightly linked to the national economy, and as a result, our state's prosperity, the prosperity of our citizen depends in no small measure on the ability of all public servants in washington to come together on a path forward. uncertainty here in federal support hurts both our economies and the federal budget, and the implications are incredibly important. governors have been working with the president, the vice president, and congressional leadership to find solutions to help put our country back on firm financial footing. one of the largest elements of the uncertainty concerned elements of the fiscal cliff that were either postponed or taken out of the reason -- recent relief act of 2012 as the only postponed reducing grants to states
and replenish our beaches. our department of education has worked night and day to get schools reopened right away, and where that wasn't possible, to get them restored by the next school year, all while maintaining our commitment to a full 180-day school year of education for our kids. executive order 107 makes sure that when insurance payments do come, they are not compromised by excessive deductibles and ensures that our citizens maximize their reimbursement. while there are dozens of other examples of the never quit attitude of this administration and our citizens, there is none better than the miracle of route 35 in mantoloking. at the mantoloking bridge, route 35 had been completely washed away by sandy. i stood at the spot where the atlantic ocean flowed into the bay where route 35 once carried thousands of cars a day to vacations down the shore. within days, commissioner jim simpson, the department of transportation and our private sector partners had a temporary road built to allow emergency vehicles onto the island. now, merely 10 weeks after our state's worst storm, you see a perma
for education certainly. annette has more now from sacramento governor brown says the budget deficit has been wiped out. and per pupil spending will go up almost 2700 dollars by 2016 under controversial proposal to give schools more money if they have higher numbers of low income and non-english speaking students. >> growing up in compton or richmond is not like it is to grow up in los gatos or beverly history or piedmont. >>reporter: higher education will see bump of 2000 dollars or so per student in the same time period. all thanks to rebounding economy and california voters for approving the tax hike under proposition 30 last november. >> they voted for the tax measure. putting money natural schools as i said but we are also not going to play the game of spending money we didn't vishtion the budget plan includes 1 billion dollar rainy day fund while democrat like the blue print proposal also drew cautious praise from republic kaichbilitys i think the governor deserves credit for advance ago budget plan that gemly imposes fiscal restraint when we need it. >>reporter: some were disappoi
you mate think. campaign to educate residents about the real meaning of the word campaign that began in chicago and now reached the bay area. amma explains. >> what is yours is the statement on the side of the muni bus. part of educational campaign created by care the council on american islamic relation. group put 35 ads open buses rolling through the streets of san francisco. >> intention of the campaign is to educate fellow americans about what the word jihad mean means. >>reporter: she is the executive director of care bay area office. >> common misconception of the word is that it means armed struggle or holy war. and that is something that is perpetrated by many who have made careers out of pushing this anti-muslim sentiment. >>reporter: i asked if they gnaw the definite figures of jihad. >> holy war. >>reporter: miriam did he fains it as holy war and another definition. >> proper meaning as we describe it is to struggle. to me that is building relationships with the neighbors to make to work on time or better on the diet. >>reporter: meaning many may not know. >> i di
a potential customer's attention long enough to explain the differences as well and to educate on those nuances of renewable energy credit versus bundleeled kilowatt hours and it's complex and i don't know how long they will colerate -- tolerate us on the porch talking but that is a key part and the education component in order to survey them and what they think is an important part of it, so we will be conducting our third city wide customer survey in early january to test this new premium price that we have established and as well as this and the pg&e green tariff option is available to them. we will use the results of the surveys then to redine the roll out of the program. it will help us make sure we anticipate the right number of -- right percentage of opt out across the city, and we will take that heat map i showed you with the green and that survey will modify the specifics of that heat map again because we will have better information once again about customer acceptance of the program and then that wraps up the first quarter and we will have enough information then to come to
a fire. we've worked hard to educate them, i think a lot of them get it now but it was a challenge initially. >> thank you. do you want to say anything? >> yeah, i wanted to comment on operatability within the california national guard. they worked really well within the framework that we established with cal fire and then beyond that throughout the national guard and the army, all of our aviators train to the same standards so really we're able to integrate any aircrew from any state, any component, into our program at any time because we're operating you noah cording you know, according to the same standards. back in 2008 we had a very large fire event here in california and we aircraft from 22 states responding to that. there is capability to respond within the national guard alone and we have started developing relationships with our title 10 partners, we do similar academics every year like they do so i think that helps generate interoperatability amongst the title 10 and title 32 assets within the state as well. >> well, i don't know about you all but i feel pretty comfor
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